Adding Depth to Your Fiction—Body Language 101

Another great post for us writers by Kristen Lamb.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Dog Body Language Image by Gopal 1035

Today regular guest writer Alex Limberg is back with a post that will make any of your dialogue scenes sound so much smoother. His piece is about body language. Raise your eyebrows and drop your chin in delight, because Alex is about to help you get under your readers’ skin with your dialogue. Also, you should definitely check out his free checklist about “44 Key Questions” to make your story awesome. Now clap your hands: 3… 2… 1… here we go:

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“Crossing my bridge on your flying rhinoceros? You better reconsider that,” the troll said and raised his fist.

When you are reading the sentence above, you know immediately what the situation is about: The troll is threatening the other person (and a flying rhino is coming your way). And the reason you know exactly what’s up is, you guessed it, the fitting description…

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A note from the Editor

Seeking to have your story published? Submit your #memoir to Two Drops of Ink.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

Good morning Two Drops followers, readers, and contributors. I wanted to drop a quick note to thank you all for the massive response we received to the “Memoir Challenge,” which, by-the-way, is still not complete. I still have a couple of submissions to edit and publish. It appears that memoir is one of the favorite genres here on the blog. This comes as no surprise to those of us that love this genre; it’s still a hot genre in the publishing world. I would encourage those of you that are writing memoirs to go back and look at some of our Literary Agent updates where you will find a list of agents looking for memoir queries.

I want to take a moment to thank all of our loyal readers, followers, and contributors. We have created a unique “animal” here at Two Drops of Ink. We have managed to create a…

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We Practice What We Preach: Scott Biddulph is Published Elsewhere

Get to know more about Two Drops of Ink editor. Read his post on Indie Plot Twist.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

Note from the Assistant Editor, Marilyn L. Davis

We know the power of guest posts at Two Drops of Ink and actively solicit them. Our motives are to give our readers a literary experience told from several perspectives, voices and styles. Second, it means that each writer doesn’t feel pressured to produce three posts a week by themselves.

And third, we have an opportunity to write for other publications.  

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Our editor, Scott Biddulph, won’t brag on himself. I, on the other hand, will.  He recently wrote What’s in a Noun: How I Went from a Wannabe to a Writerfor Indie Plot Twist. (It’s the third post down; don’t leave until you read it).

I know the story, but many of you don’t, so this gives you more background on Scott, but just as importantly, it may just give you the courage to write that book.

Or at least submit…

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The Problem with Pen Names

Do you plan to use a pen name? It was my plan until I read this blog post. Very interesting and informative.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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When I first became a writer, one of my favorite activities was dreaming what my pen name would be. I’d even practice signing it so that, you know, I didn’t accidentally scribble Kristen Lamb in my runaway best-selling book at my glamorous book signing.

Don’t judge me. Y’all did it too 😛 .

Before anyone gets in a fluff, understand two things. First, I’m on your side. If you want or need a pen name? Rock on! If you already have one? Keep it! If a sexy exotic name makes you write better stories? Go for it!

This is only a decision the author can make. My only goal here is to make sure y’all are making educated business decisions. Thus, I won’t stop anyone from having a pen name, but about 95% of the time? They’re unnecessary.

The modern author already has to take on far more than…

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The ProBlogger and What he Learned about Blogging

If you are wondering about the face lift to my blog. I owe it all to the teachings of Peter B. Giblett and The ProBlogger. Study the article on https://gobbledegoox.wordpress.com and visit The ProBlogger to improve your blog and possibly start earning a living as well as more followers.

The Writer’s Journal – a Vital Tool

Peter Giblett has the information to keep us writers on our toes.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By Peter B. Giblett

A writer has to always be on the lookout for new material, but at the same time they come across snippets of information that may or may not be of any use in the future, that is what is the purpose of a writer’s journal. One thing the journal is NOT is a diary or account of how good or bad their day was, but a place to record ideas, snippets, life moments, things you have heard, etc. Personally, I use an electronic journal, but I know of many writers that use a paper notebook to jot down their experiences, either way, what is important is getting into the habit of note taking and taking your notebook everywhere with you.

A writers notebook is a sanctuary for a deliberate cultivated awareness of our surroundings, imagination and inner world. ~ Jessica P. Morrell 2007.

Gathering Place…

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Why should I blog?

What are your reasons for blogging? I blog to educate, entertain and to promote my writing and the writings of others.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

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Photo courtesy of University of North Georgia Press

Take a good look around you, there is something interesting happing in or around your life:

I was sitting in a creative writing class with Quinten Falk, a very well know writer and film critic in the U.K., and I was listening to a young student lament about her writing. I often study young people like some new-fangled phenomenon. I watched her and listened, as I frequently do with the younger people that I’m in college alongside, looking to cut to the chase of her problem and offer a solution, if possible.

I love to watch young people ponder their situations. I always hope to see them emerge from the fog with a clear path in mind. I like to offer suggestions if the circumstances are right. In this case it was easy, she needed to write and to chance exposing…

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Writing and Using Metaphors

My latest post on “Two Drops of Ink” a blog for seasoned and new writers!!!

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By Lydia Oyetunji

“Writing is The Air I Breathe. Without it I will surely Die.”

 Are you familiar with metaphors? How often do you include them in your writing? I’m a writer who has been newly introduced to metaphors. I remember metaphors and similes from my high school years, but I don’t think I have applied them to my writing very often. My purpose for writing this article is to refresh the memory of seasoned writers as well as assist new writers.

What is a metaphor?

Simply put, a metaphor is a figure of speech comparing two different things that have something in common. Metaphor is a Greek word that means to “transfer” of “carry across.” Metaphors “carry across” the meaning from one image, word, or idea to another. Be careful not to confuse the comparing of two items with similes, by using “like” or “as.”

How do I…

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Memoir: Your Story, My Story, Our Stories

Learn how to write your memoir from Marilyn Davis. Read this and other informative articles on Two Drops of Ink.

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

“Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy—the experiences that make us the most vulnerable. Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” ― Brené Brown

Memoir: Your Story, My Story, Our Story Two Drops of Ink

I’ve created a truth for myself over the years. There is nothing new under the sun; the experience wore my face one time, and yours another. In other words, there is someone somewhere who shares the experience and the way out. How might this approach prove invitational to someone struggling with an issue in their lives? By letting them know that others have overcome significant obstacles, made changes and now live better lives.

The memoir tells the story of the…

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Arcing, Enhancing, and Advancing the Memoir

Have you visited Two Drops of Ink? If not check out this article!!!

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

Memoirs are hot topics again. Like all literature, memoir goes in and out of favor. However, with so many people blogging, self-publishing, and “knowing their story will touch millions”, there is ample opportunity to write a good and bad memoir.

Since my memoir, Finding North: A Woman’s Journey from Addict 2 Advocate is with the editor, I don’t have to focus on the product but have time to write about the planning and process of memoir writing, because it’s within the planning and processing that we improve upon the story. That is not to say that we embellish, mislead or outright lie in our memoir, but we do enhance the events, and concentrate on the emotions, thoughts, and conflict of the protagonist – and that’s us.

One of the best ways to accomplish this is to create a bell curve and decide a starting point in…

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